Frequently asked questions


Leadership

What kinds of positions should we have in our leadership team?


Beyond a club president, it's helpful to have a leader for each of the following  areas: fundraising, partnership with the Christian community, promotion, Christian materials, administration coordination, and club mobilization. Each of these leaders can develop club members to help them in these roles.


Are we limited by having a small leadership team?


Clubs with small leadership teams can do amazing things on their campus!  Don't let numbers hinder your campus outreach dreams and goals. However, it’s always a good idea to try to get more Christians involved. See more info on page 214 of the Outreach Guide.


What if our leadership team has a disagreement?


Disagreement is a normal and healthy part of any decision-making process. When your leadership team disagrees about a particular issue, pause and remind your leaders that you are all on the same team working toward the same goal. There are always multiple ways to achieve a goal. 

See more info on page 305 of the Outreach Guide.


What do if some of our leaders want to focus the club on other things besides outreach?


As a leadership team, you have already decided that it is a priority to share the gospel on your campus. If your leaders are interested in other things, like social justice or community service, try discussing ways you can incorporate the message of the gospel into those events! But keep the gospel your main focus!


What should we do if our advisor isn’t supportive of our outreach?


Respectfully, sit down and have a conversation to find out why your advisor doesn’t want you to do outreach. He or she may have concerns that you can quickly address. Share your heart for outreach with your advisor. If needed, bring your NSP Campus Mentor into the dialogue. If the problem continues, you may want to find another teacher on campus who shares your heart for outreach.


Our leadership team doesn't really "click." How do we develop the community of our leadership team?


The leaders on your team don’t need to be best friends, but it is important to cultivate those relationships. Find ways for your leaders to get to know each other! Plan hangouts outside of meetings. Eat lunch together or plan a bowling night. Ask about each other’s lives and pray together.


Who should we recruit people to be on our leadership team, and how can we develop new leaders for our club?


Check out the “Lead With a Long-Term Perspective” training on page 271 of the Outreach Guide.


How can my club meetings be more appealing to students on campus?


Be creative! Try bringing in exciting speakers, playing games, having “breakout” groups where students can get to know each other, playing music at the beginning of meetings, serving pizza or snacks, giving away free Christian materials, or showing thought-provoking videos.


How can my leadership team share the vision of outreach with our club members?


One basic way to share the vision is to spend time during club meetings praying for the students on your campus that don’t know Jesus. Outreach-focused messages, witnessing training, and reminders of your club’s mission are other great ways. Don’t forget to announce your outreach plans early and often and give club members opportunities to get involved! 


For more on sharing your vision, turn to page 36 of the Outreach Guide. 

Review “Announce Your Plans” on page 161 of the Outreach Guide. 

Review the training on mobilization on page 214 of the Outreach Guide.


Members (or leaders) in our club have theological disagreements. Is that okay?


Christians will not always agree on every theological matter, and that’s okay! The most important thing is that everyone has an accurate understanding of the basic gospel message. Talk to your youth pastor and make sure the varying beliefs are biblical. Ask them for advice on how you should handle these disagreements so that you can be a united club, focused together on the mission before you.


How can we get our club members more involved?


Both empowerment and mobilization are key to helping Christians on your campus become more active. For more on empowerment, turn to page 46 of the Outreach Guide. For more on mobilization, turn to page 214 of the Outreach Guide


Legal Rights and Guidelines


BASIC LEGAL RIGHTS


What laws allow me to reach my school for Christ?


The 1st Amendment to the US Constitution and the Equal Access Act. 


The 1st Amendment grants you freedom of religion and freedom of speech, which includes protecting your right to witness on campus, distribute Christian materials, pass out flyers, wear promotional shirts, etc. The Equal Access Act grants you the same privileges as any other club on campus. The Equal Access Act prohibits discrimination against your club because of religious content and it protects your right to meet on campus, reserve rooms, hang posters, announce your events on the school PA, etc. See more info on page 4 of the Outreach Guide.


What if our school won't let us start a Christian club? What if they don't allow any clubs on campus?


Find out why the school is prohibiting clubs. If your school doesn’t allow clubs simply to prevent religious clubs, that would be religious discrimination. Contact the Pacific Justice Institute to help you inform the school of your rights as a student.


WITNESSING


When can I witness at my school?


The law protects your right to witness any time you could normally carry on a conversation at your school. In other words, before school, during breaks, at lunch, and after school are all great opportunities. You should not disrupt class to witness, just as you are not allowed to disrupt class for anything else.


Where can I witness at my school?


Anywhere on your campus that students are allowed to be!


Could witnessing be considered harassment?


Witnessing alone is not harassment. However, witnessing can become harassment if a student repeatedly asks you to stop. The bottom line: If a student asks you to stop, then stop!


Can I pass out materials while I witness?


Yes, the 1st Amendment protects your right to distribute Bibles, tracts, flyers, or any other literature as part of your freedom of speech. The Supreme Court has ruled that written material is considered "pure speech" and constitutionally protected speech.


Can my NSP Mentors or my youth pastor come on campus to help me with witnessing?


It depends on the policies of your school. Your school may allow guests to come on campus after school, or it may require guests to stay off campus, which usually means standing on the sidewalk. Generally speaking, guests should not share the gospel with students on campus during school hours because during school hours they are not covered under the 1st Amendment rights the same way that students are. They should also be cautious about entering the campus after school hours. It is best for guests to witness in front of the school. Guests should always be polite and comply with requests from school officials even if they are asked to leave the school property.


Is it legal to witness in malls or other public places?


Yes, you have the freedom of speech to talk with people at a mall. You can obviously start a conversation with people at the mall about any topic, and you can't be limited in your speech because it is a religious topic. However, it is important that you are respectful of shopping areas and only speak with willing participants (those who want to talk with you). We advise you not to loiter around the entrances of shops or distract customers inside of stores.


CHRISTIAN MATERIALS


Is it legal to pass out Christian materials on campus?


Yes. As long as you're not disrupting class time, The 1st Amendment protects your right to distribute literature. It is considered the same as speaking.


Who can pass out Christian materials to students?


During school hours, only students can legally pass out materials to other students. Make sure your rally guests are aware of this because it is an easy way to get into trouble by accident. Not even your teachers are allowed to pass out materials; however, they can store materials in their classroom on your behalf.


Does our club need permission to set up a Christian materials table at our rally or for our mass materials distribution event?


Yes. Individually, you can distribute materials any time because of your rights  under the 1st Amendment. But if you're holding an event or reserving campus space (like a room or a table), your school may have rules that you need to follow, just like any other club would.


Is it legal for guests to  bring materials onto campus for rallies and witnessing events?


There is nothing legally against it. However, we recommend that you bring your  own materials to campus so your administration does not think outside guests are running the event.


Can we sell materials at our school?


You need to check with your advisor about your school’s policies regarding the  sale of goods and fundraising.


RALLIES


Is it legal to host religious events on my campus?


Yes. Under the Equal Access Act, all clubs must be given the same privileges when it comes to hosting events. Your administration cannot limit your event just because it contains religious content.


Does our club really have the legal right to reserve the gymnasium, auditorium, or quad at our school?


Yes. The Equal Access Act guarantees you the same rights as any other club on campus.


Can guests visit our rallies and Christian club meetings?


Yes. But guest policies vary school to school. Some schools may require you to get clearance for visitors in advance and some may even require authorization from your club advisor. Make sure you understand your school’s policies regarding visitors before you ask a guest to come to your club. According to the Equal Access Act, guests may visit your club as long as they are not visiting frequently. This is in order to ensure that the club remains student-run (each school interprets what “frequently” means for themselves).


Are there any limitations on what a guest speaker can say at a rally?


For outdoor rallies, we recommend that speakers share their testimony and keep their message in 1st person, rather than making 'you should' statements. And we strongly suggest that you do not give an invitation for students to receive Christ if you are outdoors because it is considered a “captive audience” location. For indoor rallies, we recommend that speakers share the gospel boldly and give students an opportunity to pray to receive Christ. 

See more info on page 114 of the Outreach Guide.


To what degree can non-students participate in a rally?


Guests, including Campus Mentors and youth pastors, should be observers at your outreach events. Just like your club meetings, your outreach events are entirely student-run, so we recommend that all guests of the club should have minimal involvement at a rally. Guests should be cautious about inviting students to rallies and passing out materials. During school hours, guests should never initiate witnessing conversations with students at rallies. If students approach guests and ask them religious questions, then it is usually best to introduce those students to members of the Christian club.


What about ‘altar calls’? Can we invite students to pray to accept Christ at a rally?


We recommend “No” for outdoor rallies, but “Yes” for indoor rallies. For most outdoor rallies, your audience didn’t choose to attend (e.g. your rally is where everyone ‘has to’ eat lunch) so it’s considered a “captive audience”. To be safe and keep your school administration worry-free, we recommend that you limit your speaking to a 1st person testimony perspective, you do not preach, and you do not hold altar calls at your outdoor events. For most indoor rallies, students choose to come inside or to leave, so they are considered “free-will assemblies.” This gives you permission to share the gospel with them and give them the opportunity to respond without fear of opposition. 

See more info on page 114 of the Outreach Guide.


Can my church host an outreach rally of its own on our campus?


The school is required to allow the public, including Christian groups, to use its facilities if it has allowed other groups to do so in the past. But most likely, the event will need to take place after school.


PROMOTION


Is it legal to pass out flyers for events?


Yes. Advertising flyers are considered to be the same as talking according to the 1st Amendment. It is considered "pure speech".


Is it legal to wear shirts promoting our events or a Christian message?


As long as the messages are not obscene, text on your clothing is legally considered to be the same as talking: protected under the 1st Amendment as "pure speech".


Is it legal to put up posters around our school advertising our rallies?


Yes. Under the Equal Access Act, as long as other clubs can do so, your club can as well. Your club will need to comply with your school’s policies regarding where, when, and for how long posters can be put up. You will also need to get the posters signed off in advance by the proper administrator before you hang them up. But your administration cannot limit the content you put on your posters.


Is it legal to put up posters with Christian messages on them?


Yes. Your administration cannot discriminate against posters because of religious content. However, your posters should primarily be used to advertise your rallies and club meetings so make sure to highlight this information. Even though religious content is allowed, slogans for posters generally need to be approved in advance. We recommend that you get a list of slogans approved before you go through the work of making a lot of posters. 


See more info on page 138 of the Outreach Guide. 

See more helpful tips on making posters on page 200 of the Outreach Guide.


TEACHERS


To what degree can teachers participate with our club?


According to the Pacific Justice Institute, “when acting in their official capacities as representatives of the state, teachers, school administrators, and other school employees are prohibited by the Establishment Clause from encouraging or discouraging prayer. Teachers may, however, take part in religious activities where the overall context makes clear that they are not participating in their official capacities.”1 That means that teachers are allowed to participate in religious activities only in their off time from school, such as attending a Bible study with other teachers, but they cannot participate in student-run activities because they must remain in a supervisory role. Your advisor is a part of your club strictly as a representative of the school, and while they most likely care about the club deeply, all of your meetings, events and efforts must be student-run.


1 Brad and Susan Dacus, Reclaim Your School. (Sacramento: Pacific Justice Institute, 2007), pp 150.


Can our club advisor get in trouble as a result of our club hosting rallies?


Because advisors are responsible for the clubs that they oversee, there is often a fear by students and teachers that if a Christian club becomes evangelistic, then the job of the teacher overseeing the club could be threatened. From a legal standpoint, there is no danger as long as the right precautions are taken. If your club complies with school policies and all outreach is student-run, then your advisor should have no problems from the administration. It is important that your advisor should not participate in any of your rallies except to provide supervision (see question above).


Is it legal for a teacher on campus to discourage students from attending our rallies or prevent us from hosting them?


No! In the same way that teachers cannot legally endorse religious activities, they also cannot say anything against them. Teachers must remain completely neutral and uninvolved under the “Establishment Clause.”


Can I share the gospel with my teachers?


Yes, but know that teachers are limited in their legal ability to have a meaningful conversation with you about the subject. Because they can only speak about faith when approached by a student, they may be hesitant to speak with you due to fears of potential legal repercussions. We recommend inviting teachers to your rallies or seeing if your family would have them over to your home. You can also share about the gospel through your written assignments.


Is it legal for Christian students to share their faith in oral/written assignments and artwork?


Yes! Teachers must not discriminate against students for including religious content in their classwork. This is protected by the 1st Amendment. Teachers must follow the same criteria that they would use for grading any other assignment.


ADMINISTRATION APPROVAL


What is the best way to talk with our administration about legal concerns?


We have a full guide that will walk you through this process. See “How To Respond to Conflicts With Your Administration” online.


What if our administration won't give us an answer to our approval requests?


Follow through with them on a consistent basis. Go back into your administrative office and ask for their answer. Be respectful to them in all you say. While it is a rare scenario, be aware that they may be stalling in their answer to limit your plans, so boldly and lovingly ask to speak to them again and again so that doesn't happen.


See “How To Respond to Conflicts With Your Administration” online.


What if our administration denies our request for an Outreach Week?


Find out why they denied your request. If the reason is legitimate (scheduling conflict, not enough notice for approval, consistency in not allowing any group on campus to do what you requested, etc.), you'll need to accept it and try to reschedule. If the denial was discriminatory or uninformed concerning your legal rights as a Christian club, be prepared to present a copy of the PJI booklet to clarify the laws and opportunities you have as a student on campus. Respectfully ask them to reconsider. At that point, if they still deny your request, contact the PJI for more legal counsel. 


See “How To Respond to Conflicts With Your Administration” online.


What if our administration blocks something already approved? (i.e. shuts down one of our events or tells us to take down our posters)


If administration prohibits you from continuing any of your outreach efforts, go immediately to the main office and schedule an appointment with your principal. Respectfully request to speak with him or her as soon as possible to find out their concerns, so you can help clarify things. Come prepared with your 1st Amendment and Equal Access Act information.


What if our administration tells us that we can't ... host rallies, go witnessing, pass out materials, or pass out fliers?


Respectfully remind them of your rights under the 1st Amendment and the Equal Access Act. See “How To Respond to Conflicts With Your Administration” online. 


RESOLVING LEGAL PROBLEMS


Can my advisor talk with the administration on our behalf?


Absolutely. Your advisor can be your greatest advocate on campus. Keep your advisor in the loop through all of your plans, so they can go talk with your administrator on your behalf.


Can NSP help us get legal situations resolved at our school?


NSP has no legal authority on your campus. We will coach and encourage you to stand up for your own legal rights. And we can equip you to contact the Pacific Justice Institute to seek legal counsel.


How can our club get legal help?


Contact the Pacific Justice Institute to get free legal assistance with issues at your school. Fill out the online form at http://www.pacificjustice.org/request-legal-assistance.html. A helpful, friendly lawyer will contact you to discuss your

situation and provide you the information and support you need.


Witnessing


Why should I go witnessing?


In the Great Commission, Jesus commands us to make disciples. Witnessing, or more simply stated, “sharing the gospel,” is the first step in making disciples! 


Why do I need to verbally share the gospel?


The word 'gospel' literally means 'good news'. The only way we can share the good news of Jesus is through opening our mouths and telling others about it. Loving actions come with sharing the gospel, but we shouldn't confuse these actions with sharing the gospel itself. How will they hear the gospel unless someone tells it to them?


Why should I use a gospel booklet?


Gospel booklets help you clearly share the gospel point by point in just a few minutes. Also, they naturally lead into asking the person if they would like to receive Christ, and they allow you to leave the gospel message with the person at the end of your conversation.


How do I prepare myself to share the gospel with someone?


Know why you should witness, address fear of failure and rejection, pray for boldness, pray for God to work in the heart of the person you're talking to, and pray to be filled with the Spirit.

See more info on page 80 of the Outreach Guide.


How do I start a conversation with someone?


Be friendly and introduce yourself, and ask a question that can transition the conversation into spiritual things. For more, check out "Witnessing in 5 Steps” on page 80 of the Outreach Guide.


What if someone that I am witnessing to says that they are already a Christian?


Talk with them! Find out if they truly understand the gospel. If they don't, share it with them. If it is evident that they have already made the decision to follow Jesus, then spend time with them helping them grow in their walk with Him.


Check out “Sharing the Gospel With Christians” on page 89 of the Outreach Guide.


What do I do if someone has a question that I don't know the answer to?


Be honest and humble. Let them know that it's a really good question and that you don't actually know the answer. Either let them know that you'll find the answer for them and get back to them, or refer them to everystudent.com, a great resource to answer questions students have about God.


Rallies


What is a rally? 


A rally is an on-campus outreach event hosted by your school’s Christian club.


See more info on page 113 of the Outreach Guide.


Why should my club host rallies? Why can’t we just witness?


Witnessing and rallies are important for different reasons. Though not as personal as witnessing, you will be able to reach more students through a rally than a witnessing day alone. Also, a student who might be not be open to having a 1-on-1 conversation with someone can sit in the back and listen. Your club will be most effective if you do both!


Our lunch period is really short. How do we make the most of the time?


You need to have each minute of your lunch period planned perfectly. How long does it take students to get from their class to your rally? What time does lunch start and end? When will students need to leave your rally to get to class on time?


See more info on page 126 of the Outreach Guide.


What details does our administration need to know in order to approve a rally?


Administration needs to know where the rally will be held, when it will be held, and what will be happening at the rally. If a speaker or performer is coming, administration needs to know who these guests are and what they will be doing.


For more on getting the approval of your administration, see page 152 of the Outreach Guide. 

For more on confirming these plans with your administration, see page 211 of the Outreach Guide.


How do we find performers/speakers for a rally?


Brainstorm with your club to see if there are any performers or speakers they personally know. Ask your pastors for a list of who they personally know. Are there people in your church who specialize in apologetics? Ask other Christian club leaders if they have connections. Your Campus Mentors may have connections for you too.


How can we prep our guest speakers and performers so they know what to expect?


Prior to the day of the rally, you should contact your speakers and performers and prepare them with the following information: the time and location of the rally, any administrative procedures they must follow, what you would like them to speak on, how long you would like them to speak, and what they are/are not allowed to say (depending on the rally location).


See more info on page 221 of the Outreach Guide.   


How do we get a microphone/PA system for our rally?


Find out who is in charge of media equipment at your school. Ask your advisor. You may need to go to your school's library or media service department. Make sure you request the equipment with enough advance notice.


Should we serve food at the rally?


Food is always a great incentive for students to come to your rally, especially if it saves them a trip to their locker or the cafeteria to pick up their food. Food can only help the rally's attendance go up. Find out whether or not your school allows food in the location you're holding your rally and make sure to get it approved with your administration.


How can we set up for the rally?


You can set up either before school or during the class period before the rally (if your advisor can get you a pass to get out of class). Make sure you have enough leaders to help you set up!


Where do we set up the materials table?


Set up the table where students can clearly see it and where they can easily access it. If you are hosting an indoor rally, set up the table closer to the door so students can grab materials as they leave.


Where should we set up our food at a rally?


It's most convenient to set up the food near the entrance/exit of the rally so students can grab the food on their way out. If it's an outdoor rally, set up the food near where the speaker/performer will be, so students will come closer and hear what the speaker is sharing.


What should we tell club members to do during the rally? 


Club members can sit with their friends and classmates who are attending the rally. They can also help greet students or pass out food, contact cards, and Christian materials.


See more info on page 216 of the Outreach Guide.


If students walk out of the rally before the rally is over, what do we do?


It's okay if students walk out of the rally before it's over. You cannot lock them in! One way to prevent them from leaving early, however, is to keep the doors shut and serve food only at the end of the rally so they don’t try to come just for the food.


What should I do if a student just takes food and immediately leaves the rally?


One way to prevent students from leaving early is by refraining to hand out the food until the rally is over. If you do want to hand out food at the beginning, politely ask students to not take food unless they are staying for the rally.


How can we keep track of the people who come to our rallies?


As students come to your rally, hand them each a contact card. Once the speaker finishes the message, request each student to fill out the contact card and turn it in to a specific location (e.g. to club members standing at the back of the gymnasium thanking students for coming, or a box in the back of the room).


When do we pass out response cards?


It is most efficient to pass out contact cards as students walk in, but if you do, be sure to instruct them to not fill out the cards until instructed to do so. You can also wait to pass them out until the speaker prompts you to do so. In this case, make sure you have multiple club members ready to help you pass them out as quickly as possible. Be sure to have a box to collect them, too.


What do we do if our rally gets shut down by administration?


If your Outreach Week has started and your administration suddenly prohibits you from continuing any of your outreach efforts, go immediately to the main office and schedule an appointment with your principal. Respectfully request to speak with him or her as soon as possible. Come prepared with information regarding your First Amendment and Equal Access Act rights. Ask what their concerns are and have a clear conversation with them to help resolve the problem as quickly as possible, so it doesn’t interfere with your other outreach events that week.

follow-up

Why should I do follow-up? 


Follow-up gives students who have recently heard the gospel and who are seeking to know more about God the opportunity to learn more, grow, and connect with other believers. For those who have already made a decision to follow Christ, we follow up so that we can get them plugged into a place where they can grow in their faith and start living an abundant life in Christ!

See more info on page 133 of the Outreach Guide.


Who should I follow up with?


You can follow up with students you’ve had witnessing conversations with, students who attended a rally and accepted Christ, students who attended a rally and didn’t accept Christ, Christians who are looking to grow in their faith...anyone! Anyone who has been exposed to the gospel needs encouragement to keep growing in the knowledge of God.


My friend went to the rally. What do I do now?


For some people, the thought of talking about God with someone they know can be more nerve-racking than with someone they don’t. But, students you know should be the easiest! You already have a connection. Remember, if they attended the rally, they must be interested, or at least curious. You can start by asking your friend what he or she thought of the rally and if they have any questions. Then invite them to your club and youth group.


See more info on page 237 of the Outreach Guide.


The Outreach Week is over and now there are new students coming to our club meetings! What should we do?


Welcoming new students is a good start. Try to make them feel comfortable and included. The easiest method is to assign one leader to talk with each new student. The leader should ask how they heard about the club, offer to answer questions, invite them back next week, and see if they would like to attend a church with someone.


See more info on page 248 of the Outreach Guide.


When I meet with a student for a one-on-one conversation, what if they ask a question about God that I can’t answer?

Be honest and humble. Let them know that it’s a really good question, and you don’t actually know the answer for them. Either let them know that you’ll find the answer for them, or connect them with a youth pastor or mature Christian.


How do I follow up after a witnessing conversation?


You can check in with that person a little later (whether you got their information and can give them a call or you see them around school). Start by asking them whether they’ve thought about your conversation and if they’d be willing to talk more. See where they are and what the next step might be for building their faith.


See more info on page 244 of the Outreach Guide.


My club leadership team is really small. How can we follow up with everyone who attended our outreach?


Get your club members or others from your Christian community involved! Just remember, follow-up is really important. Even if you need to work on it little by little, don't give up!


How can club members help with follow-up?


Follow-up is a wonderful time to build leadership in your club. You can have them gather information from the contact cards, train them to make phone calls with you, or have them participate in (or even lead!) a follow-up club meeting. Invite them to a follow-up training day you will have for your club.


See more info on page 225 of the Outreach Guide.


What opportunities are there for youth pastors to help in follow-up?


Pastors can help students plug into the local church. You can also ask your youth pastor if he or she is willing to do a special follow-up youth night in order to answer questions or teach the basics of Christianity.


I feel awkward calling students I don't know. How can I fight that fear?


First of all, pray! Pray that God would give you boldness and wisdom. Remember that follow-up is a key part of sharing the gospel and also needs to be done in the Spirit. Also remember that this student already had a conversation with your or attended an event; the work has already been started!

mobilization

Why should my club involve the Christian community?


The Bible tells us to equip and build up other believers in faith. By involving the Christian community, you are giving them the opportunity to be involved in sharing the gospel and building up the body of Christ! Also, the Christian community can be a valuable resource for your outreach needs.


What groups of people should we ask to be involved?


Anybody who has a heart for sharing the gospel at your school! This could include: your parents, youth pastor, teachers on your campus, your advisor, members of your church, etc.


How do we get people on board to help us?


In order for people to help you, they need to know what they are helping you with. Make a list of everything you want to accomplish this year. Brainstorm the people in your life who you think can help you. Go to those people, explain your heart for the year, and ask them to partner with you in bringing the gospel to your campus.


See more info on page 37 of the Outreach Guide.


What can parents do to participate in our outreach?


Parents can pray for you and your club, host meetings at their home, bake or provide food for rallies, recommend speakers/performers for your rallies, and attend rallies for moral support and to pray. Share your outreach needs with your parents and then ask if they’d like to be involved and what sorts of things they would be interested in doing.


How can my youth pastor participate in our outreach?


Your youth pastor can pray for you and your club, help with the design and details of your outreach, and attend rallies, club meetings, and followup club meetings as a guest or speaker. They can also host your Kick-Off and Celebration Events in the church facilities.


See more info on page 165 of the Outreach Guide.


What can teachers do to participate in our outreach?


Unfortunately, your teachers are very limited in how they can participate in outreach. (See the questions under the "Legal FAQ"). However, you can definitely ask your teacher to store materials in his or her classroom and pray for your outreach! Invite them to partner with you and attend all of your events. Their prayer support and encouragement is invaluable. They will undoubtedly be inspired and encouraged to see what God is doing on their campus.


What can people from my church do to participate in our outreach?


They can offer personal resources, financial support, prayer, and they can also help you spread the word about your outreach.


How can I tell my church congregation about what we're doing?


You can make an announcement during a church service, include information about your upcoming Outreach Week in the church bulletin, and submit prayer requests through your church's prayer ministry.


Can our Christian club work with other churches in the area also?


Absolutely! How exciting would it be to have the entire Christian community united together to help reach your school? Take a survey in your club and find out what churches are represented! Empower the club leaders and members to share the vision of campus outreach with their youth pastor(s) and ask if they would be willing to partner with you and your mission this year.


See more info on page 38 of the Outreach Guide.


What events can I invite the Christian community to attend?


Pretty much anything! Your Kick-Off and Celebration Events are awesome events for them to attend. They’d love coming to your rallies as well. Just make sure to follow any administrative procedures for approving guests to come on campus.


How can we ask people to help sponsor our outreach budget?


Ask boldly! Share the your vision for outreach at your school and your outreach needs, and ask if they want to give! Sit down with them face to face and ask them to prayerfully consider supporting your mission. Trust that God will provide for your needs. Yes, He uses the generosity of people to provide for you, but He is ultimately your provider.

rallies

What is a rally? 


A rally is an on-campus outreach event hosted by your school’s Christian club.


See more info on page 113 of the Outreach Guide.


Why should my club host rallies? Why can’t we just witness?


Witnessing and rallies are important for different reasons. Though not as personal as witnessing, you will be able to reach more students through a rally than a witnessing day alone. Also, a student who might be not be open to having a 1-on-1 conversation with someone can sit in the back and listen. Your club will be most effective if you do both!


Our lunch period is really short. How do we make the most of the time?


You need to have each minute of your lunch period planned perfectly. How long does it take students to get from their class to your rally? What time does lunch start and end? When will students need to leave your rally to get to class on time?


See more info on page 126 of the Outreach Guide.


What details does our administration need to know in order to approve a rally?


Administration needs to know where the rally will be held, when it will be held, and what will be happening at the rally. If a speaker or performer is coming, administration needs to know who these guests are and what they will be doing.


For more on getting the approval of your administration, see page 152 of the Outreach Guide.

For more on confirming these plans with your administration, see page 211 of the Outreach Guide.


How do we find performers/speakers for a rally?


Brainstorm with your club to see if there are any performers or speakers they personally know. Ask your pastors for a list of who they personally know. Are there people in your church who specialize in apologetics? Ask other Christian club leaders if they have connections. Your Campus Mentors may have connections for you too.


How can we prep our guest speakers and performers so they know what to expect?


Prior to the day of the rally, you should contact your speakers and performers and prepare them with the following information: the time and location of the rally, any administrative procedures they must follow, what you would like them to speak on, how long you would like them to speak, and what they are/are not allowed to say (depending on the rally location).


See more info on page 221 of the Outreach Guide.


How do we get a microphone/PA system for our rally?


Find out who is in charge of media equipment at your school. Ask your advisor. You may need to go to your school's library or media service department. Make sure you request the equipment with enough advance notice.


Should we serve food at the rally?


Food is always a great incentive for students to come to your rally, especially if it saves them a trip to their locker or the cafeteria to pick up their food. Food can only help the rally's attendance go up. Find out whether or not your school allows food in the location you're holding your rally and make sure to get it approved with your administration.


How can we set up for the rally?


You can set up either before school or during the class period before the rally (if your advisor can get you a pass to get out of class). Make sure you have enough leaders to help you set up!


Where do we set up the materials table?


Set up the table where students can clearly see it and where they can easily access it. If you are hosting an indoor rally, set up the table closer to the door so students can grab materials as they leave.


Where should we set up our food at a rally?


It's most convenient to set up the food near the entrance/exit of the rally so students can grab the food on their way out. If it's an outdoor rally, set up the food near where the speaker/performer will be, so students will come closer and hear what the speaker is sharing.


What should we tell club members to do during the rally?


Club members can sit with their friends and classmates who are attending the rally. They can also help greet students or pass out food, contact cards, and Christian materials.


See more info on page 216 of the Outreach Guide.


If students walk out of the rally before the rally is over, what do we do?


It's okay if students walk out of the rally before it's over. You cannot lock them in! One way to prevent them from leaving early, however, is to keep the doors shut and serve food only at the end of the rally so they don’t try to come just for the food.


What should I do if a student just takes food and immediately leaves the rally?


One way to prevent students from leaving early is by refraining to hand out the food until the rally is over. If you do want to hand out food at the beginning, politely ask students to not take food unless they are staying for the rally.


How can we keep track of the people who come to our rallies?


As students come to your rally, hand them each a contact card. Once the speaker finishes the message, request each student to fill out the contact card and turn it in to a specific location (e.g. to club members standing at the back of the gymnasium thanking students for coming, or a box in the back of the room).


When do we pass out response cards?


It is most efficient to pass out contact cards as students walk in, but if you do, be sure to instruct them to not fill out the cards until instructed to do so. You can also wait to pass them out until the speaker prompts you to do so. In this case, make sure you have multiple club members ready to help you pass them out as quickly as possible. Be sure to have a box to collect them, too.


What do we do if our rally gets shut down by administration?


If your Outreach Week has started and your administration suddenly prohibits you from continuing any of your outreach efforts, go immediately to the main office and schedule an appointment with your principal. Respectfully request to speak with him or her as soon as possible. Come prepared with information regarding your First Amendment and Equal Access Act rights. Ask what their concerns are and have a clear conversation with them to help resolve the problem as quickly as possible, so it doesn’t interfere with your other outreach events that week.